Volume 6, Issue 1, June 2018, Page: 23-28
Application of Remotely Sensed Data in the Estimation of Net Radiation at the Earth’s Surface in Clear Sky Conditions
Roopashree Shrivastava, Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India
Indumathi Srinivasan Iyer, Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India
Mahabaleshwar Narayan Hegde, Environmental Survey Laboratory, Kaiga Generating Station, Karwar, India
Rajendrakumar Balkrishna Oza, Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India
Received: Feb. 7, 2018;       Accepted: Feb. 25, 2018;       Published: Mar. 20, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajrs.20180601.14      View  1289      Downloads  41
Abstract
This study focuses on the estimation of shortwave and longwave radiation utilizing measured data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA’s) Terra / Aqua satellites in clear sky conditions. The net radiation is the vector sum of the shortwave and longwave radiation coming towards and going away from the Earth’s surface. The study is carried out for a tropical site Kaiga, located in Southern India for the months of March and April representative of the warm season and the months of November and December representative of the cold season in the year 2013. The validity of the net radiation values estimated from MODIS data is assessed by comparing it with simultaneous ground based measurements from the Mini Boundary Layer Masts (MBLMs). The results indicate that the net radiation values estimated by the satellite are well correlated with the ground based measurements (R2 = 0.983). On an average, for the four months of study, the mean absolute error between the satellite and ground based measurements is 35 W m-2 where as the RMSE is 50 W m-2. Once validated with ground based measurements, the satellite derived net radiation data can be used for validation of land surface energy balance predicted by atmospheric models.
Keywords
MODIS, MBLM, Net Radiation
To cite this article
Roopashree Shrivastava, Indumathi Srinivasan Iyer, Mahabaleshwar Narayan Hegde, Rajendrakumar Balkrishna Oza, Application of Remotely Sensed Data in the Estimation of Net Radiation at the Earth’s Surface in Clear Sky Conditions, American Journal of Remote Sensing. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2018, pp. 23-28. doi: 10.11648/j.ajrs.20180601.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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